20 images of works by Jim Sconyers, Jr.

Please select image below for details and slideshow.

Images 1 - 7 follow:

The above seven triptychs were exhibited this past November and December, 2017, in a show titled imago corporis impressa state ii, in the Cleo Driver Miller Gallery of Art at Bridgewater College in Bridgewater, Virginia.

Image 8 follows:

The above triptych of gold tone salt paper prints was exhibited as part of the recent show in the Cleo Driver Miller Gallery at Bridgewater College.  The imagery is captured by a pinhole camera in a rose garden in North Carolina using color 120 film.  Each image is a multiple exposure (six exposures).  The sensitized paper is contact exposed using a digital negative.  

Image 9 follows:

The latest version of the above sculpture, The Shadow of a Greater Structure That Cannot Be Experienced state ii, was also exhibited as part of the recent show in the Cleo Driver Miller Gallery at Bridgewater College.

Image 10 follows:

The chemical symbol used for this work 3H2O is also known as tritiated water - a radioactive form of water. 3H2O was designed to draw attention to our stewardship of water.  The random tessellation of pyramids across the CNC router-cut circle subtly reveal the ionizing radiation-warning symbol (not planned). I felt compelled to create the work in the context of reckless stewardship of a precious commodity - clean water.  The inevitable release of tritium that occurs in the refueling of a nuclear reactor, the Hanford site, the recent accident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico, and the ongoing crises in Fukushima (three nuclear core meltdowns) are of particular concern.

 

In July 2017, the above work, 3H2O,  was selected by the juror Francis Thompson to receive First Place Award in the national Juried Exhibit, “Celebrate Color & Light,” at the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts. 

Images 11 - 13 follow:

The above Aposematic series consists of three separate works of art.  Aposematic coloration in nature is employed as a warning of imminent danger, and the term's use in the above works serves as a metaphor of humanity's tendency to ignore the warning signs in nature.  The imagery is that of a highway with double yellow lines.  

 

Image #11, titled Aposematic Double Yellow is a four color lithograph printed in an addition of 13.  

 

Image #12, Aposematic, is made of laser-cut, cold-rolled steel, oak, and an edition of thirteen, multiple-color, hand-printed lithographs.  Each print is chopped up and reassembled into three-dimensional pyramids.  The pyramids are then randomly tessellated across a narrow band covering 70% of the middle surface.

 

Aposematic joins an ongoing body of work addressing environmental concerns and searching the nature of patterns and their origin of direction, be it determined (in a mechanistic sense), free of any restraints, or limited (a mix of free and determined).

 

Image #13 a., titled Aposematic 2 is a smaller, table-top version of the larger work, Aposematic.

 

Image #13 b., The most recent addition to this series titled, Aposematic Fracture, received Honorable Mention Recognition in May, 2018, at the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts’ nationally juried exhibition, A Fine Line. 

Image 14 follows:

The above print, 32-Bit String, was a part of a group exhibition, Pressing Prints/Pressing Palms: The Entrepreneurial Printmaker / Reverse Watching which was exhibited aSoutheast Missouri State University, November 1-3, 2012, Cape Girardeau, MO.  The theme of the portfolio was "targeted sousveillance and inverse surveillance."  32-Bit String addresses loss of privacy and the vulnerability of our digital infrastructure.  The correct sequence of binary code can access any database.  Automobiles, hospitals, nuclear power plants, the military, the financial sector are all vulnerable.  We as humans tend to design for best case scenarios.  

 

Images 15 - 16 follow:

#15, Tomato Seedling was inspired by Pulp Fiction (#19 below).  Black paper was blended into a pulp.  Three varieties of tomato seeds were added to the pulp.  The sheets of paper were then folded into pyramids and tessellated across the surface joining pyramids with imagery of a tomato seed germinating from one of the sheets of paper.  

 

#16 Service Engine Soon is imagery of the OBDII engine warning light illuminating on the dash of my Voyager van.  Much in line with the Aposematic series above, Service Engine Soon references the warning signs nature sends us -  warnings of strain on the delicate web that supports life on this planet.  Hopefully, this work too will bring awareness of the need to, as they say in the automotive industry, "pull trouble codes" and address the problem/s.

 

Image 17 follows:

#17 is a pop-up artist's book inspired by the mythical bird (bird-like) Garuda and the magic of paper engineering.  The book is designed to be suspended from the ceiling, opened and facing downward.  When the viewer looks up, it is they that are in the sky looking downward on the mythical bird.   

 

The book was exhibited in the following exhibitions:

Group Exhibition, NO DANGER 3-Dimensional Airplane Prints, International exhibition organized and co-curated by printmakers Edward Bernstein and Franco Vecchiet, Robert L. Ringel Gallery, September 2 – October 12, 2008, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN

 

Group Exhibition, NO DANGER 3-Dimensional Airplane Prints, International exhibition organized and co-curated by printmakers Edward Bernstein and Franco Vecchiet for the 37th Southern Graphics International Printmaking Conference: Command Print, hosted by Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond International Airport, March 26 – May 9, 2008, Richmond, VA

Images 18 - 20 follow:

The earthworks installation (#18) was grown in support of the Pulp Fiction projects.  

 

Pulp Fiction (relief print) was submitted to an exchange portfolio at the  Power in Print Southern Graphics Council International Conference, March 30 – April 3, 2005, in Washington, D.C.  Prints were randomly distributed to participants who were instructed to plant the print and grow tomatoes.  A web site was also created as a part of this project to plot the progress of participants and share recipes that incorporated the fruit of their labor.  

 

The photograph (#20) Pulp Fiction, Staunton, VA., is from the series transition memory.  The image is a multiple exposure of the earthworks installation tomato garden and was captured on 120 color film using a pinhole camera.    

 

20 images of Jim's printmaking students' work

Please select image below for details and slideshow.

Additional notes regarding the assignment, process, and what the student learned follow the image portfolio below.

images 1 - 20 follow:

Additional notes regarding the assignment, process, and what the student learned follow:

Process / what the student learned:

 

Image #1.

  • Planning out a multiple layer monochromatic silkscreen / five layers
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing plan with the following techniques:
    • Building a margin with screen filler
    • Tape up of frame of print to contain ink
    • Use of screen filler as a stencil
    • Wax resist method
    • Bar soap / water soluble crayon technique
    • Drawing fluid technique
    • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
    • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
    • Pin and Tab registration / mylar guide
    • Clean–up and safe practice

Image #2.

  • The reduction of surface (linoleum) material to create a multiple color print (minimum four colors). 
  • With the use of translucent inks students learn to optically mix colors to their advantage.  Students also learn to work with ink modifiers and the concept behind viscosity printing.
  • The key plate is a separate plate and contains the detail and, in this case, the darkest value. 
  • Students are expected to edition while anticipating an attrition rate due to mistakes. 
  • Clean up, taking care of brayers and inks, and safe practice are also taught.

 

Image #3.

  • Zinc etching with nitric acid
  • Dry-point
  • Line etch
  • Aquatint with rosin
  • Editioning
  • Chine Collé
  • Use of stencil to pre-color chine collé tissue
  • Safe practice

 

Image #4.

  • Zinc etching with nitric acid
  • Dry-point
  • Line etch
  • Aquatint with rosin
  • Editioning  - with multiple states (state XIX)
  • Removal of image with a scraper and burnisher
  • Safe practice

 

Image #5.

  • Drawing image to film and paper for contact printing
  • Application of photo-polymer film to metal backing
  • Contact exposure of plate:
    • Exposure of plate to aquatint screen using NUARC MSP 3140
    • Exposure of plate to film positive with MSP 3140
  • Developing plate
  • Printing the plate
  • Editioning
  • Use of stencil to pre-color chine collé tissue

  

Image #6.

  • Scanning a drawing
  • Using Adobe Photoshop
  • Using a plug-in to (within Photoshop) generate a stochastic screen
  • Output of film positive
  • Application of photo-polymer film to metal backing
  • Contact exposure of plate:
    • Exposure of plate to aquatint screen using NUARC MSP 3140
    • Exposure of plate to film positive with MSP 3140
  • Developing plate
  • Printing the plate
  • Editioning
  • Chine Collé
  • Use of stencil to pre-color chine collé tissue

 

Image #7.

  • Importing a photograph into Adobe Photoshop
  • Using Adobe Photoshop
  • Using a plug-in (within Photoshop) to generate a stochastic screen
  • Output of film positive
  • Use and handling of photopolymer film / laminating plate
  • Contact exposure of plate:
    • Exposure of plate to aquatint screen using NUARC MSP 3140
    • Exposure of plate to film positive with MSP 3140
      • This included instruction of step testing to determine the correct amount of Light Units for each step -
  • Developing plate
  • Printing the plate
  • Editioning

 

Image #8.

  • Copper etching with ferric chloride
  • Dry-point
  • Line etch
  • Aquatint with acrylic – applied with airbrush
  • Editioning  - with multiple states
  • Removal of image with a scraper, burnisher and 2000 grit emery cloth
  • Shaping of copper plate
  • Safe practice

 

Image #9.

  • Reductive woodcut with multiple plates
  • Editioning with critical assessment of inclusion
  • This print is one of a body of work Tiffany exhibited in her senior thesis solo exhibition in Hunt Gallery at Mary Baldwin University.

 

Image #10.

  • Planning out a multiple layer monochromatic silkscreen / five layers
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing plan with the following techniques:
  • Building a margin with screen filler
  • Tape up of frame of print to contain ink
  • Use of screen filler as a stencil
  • Wax resist method
  • Bar soap / water soluble crayon technique
  • Drawing fluid technique
  • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
  • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
  • Pin and Tab registration / mylar guide
  • Clean–up and safe practice

 

Image #11.

  • 48 inches x 33 foot woodcut / printed with numerous wood plates
  • This body of work was a part of Candace’s senior thesis solo exhibition in Hunt Gallery at Mary Baldwin University.
  • The installation was also performance based.  Opening night attendees were invited to tear off perforated sections of the scroll to keep as a metaphor of new connections made through the dissemination of the work.   The work also alludes to the important connection between the Dutch and Japanese going back to the seventeenth century.  Candice wrote about this in her senior thesis paper and defended her project before a committee of faculty.

 

Image #12.

  • Lithographic process using paper plates (We had the plates printed at a local Staples that had a large format laser printer.)
  • Use of Adobe Photoshop to process the photograph
  • Understanding the correlation between pixels to dpi
  • Employing a plug-in within Adobe Photoshop to generate additional pixels needed to generate large 22” x 30” paper Xerox plates
  • Creating four color separation within Adobe Photoshop
  • Employing a plug-in within Adobe Photoshop to generate a stochastic screen (this eliminates the moiré and provides a more interesting shape than standard dot).
  • Technique for printing paper plate including:
    • Mixing of ink
    • Inking of paper plate
    • Registration
  • This print is one of a body of work Hannah exhibited in her senior thesis solo exhibition in Hunt Gallery at Mary Baldwin University.

 

Image #13.

  • Copper etching with ferric chloride
  • Dry-point
  • Line etch
  • Aquatint with acrylic – applied with airbrush
  • Spit biting
  • Chine Collé
  • Use of stencil to pre-color chine collé tissue
  • Editioning  - with multiple states
  • Removal of image with a scraper, burnisher and 2000 grit emery cloth
  • Safe practice

 

Image #14.

  • Importing photograph into Adobe Photoshop
  • Using Adobe Photoshop
  • Using a plug-in (within Photoshop) to generate a stochastic screen
  • Output of film positive
  • Use and handling of photopolymer plate / pre-coated
  • Contact exposure of plate:
    • Exposure of plate to aquatint screen using NUARC MSP 3140
    • Exposure of plate to film positive with MSP 3140
      • This included instruction of step testing to determine the correct amount of Light Units for each step -
  • Developing plate
  • Printing the plate
  • Editioning

This print #14 is one of a body of work Heather exhibited in her senior thesis solo exhibition in Hunt Gallery at Mary Baldwin University.  Images are based on images she captured while in Perquin, El Salvador.  Heather joined artist and activist, Claudia Bernardi, artist in residence with the Spencer Center for Civic and Global Engagement at MBU.  Bernardi established Walls of Hope Open School and co-founded a Studio School in situ to help heal the wounds of one of the civil war’s brutal massacres at El Mozote.

 

Image #15.

  • Planning out a multiple layer multi-color silkscreen
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing a plan with the following techniques:
    • Working with a hand drawn image on Mylar
    • Mixing photo-emulsion
    • Application of photo-emulsion to silkscreen
    • Burning of stencil to silkscreen with MSP 3140 exposing unit
    • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
    • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
    • Clean–up and safe practice

 

Image #16.

  • Planning out a multiple layer monochromatic silkscreen / five layers
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing plan with the following techniques:
    • Building a margin with screen filler
    • Tape up of frame of print to contain ink
    • Use of screen filler as a stencil
    • Wax resist method
    • Bar soap / water soluble crayon technique
    • Drawing fluid technique
    • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
    • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
    • Pin and Tab registration / mylar guide
    • Clean–up and safe practice

 

Image #17.

  • Planning out a multiple layer monochromatic silkscreen / five layers
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing plan with the following techniques:
    • Building a margin with screen filler
    • Tape up of frame of print to contain ink
    • Use of screen filler as a stencil
    • Wax resist method
    • Bar soap / water soluble crayon technique
    • Drawing fluid technique
    • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
    • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
    • Pin and Tab registration / mylar guide
    • Clean–up and safe practice

 

Image #18.

  • Planning out a multiple layer monochromatic silkscreen / five layers
  • Consideration of translucency of ink
  • Employing plan with the following techniques:
    • Building a margin with screen filler
    • Tape up of frame of print to contain ink
    • Use of screen filler as a stencil
    • Wax resist method
    • Bar soap / water soluble crayon technique
    • Drawing fluid technique
    • Ink mixing / gloss over-varnish vs. transparent base
    • Use of squeegee to flood a screen and pull a print
    • Pin and Tab registration / mylar guide
    • Clean–up and safe practice

 

Image #19.

  • Lithographic process polyester lithography plates (also known as Smart or Pronto plates)
  • Learning how to import an image into Adobe Photoshop (iMac) 
  • Use of Adobe Photoshop to process a Photograph 
  • Understanding the correlation between pixels to dpi 
  • Employing a plug-in within Adobe Photoshop to generate additional pixels needed to generate the dpi on the plate 
  • Creating four color separation within Adobe Photoshop 
  • Employing a plug-in within Adobe Photoshop to generate a stochastic screen (this eliminates the moiré and provides a more interesting shape than standard dot). 
  • Printing the CMYK separations onto four sheets of 13” x 19” litho plates. 
  • Savanna learned a technique to remove the delicate toner and replace it with a strong printing base.  The toner will not stand up to even a small edition. 
  • Learned a registration technique that guarantees perfect registration of each plate to the paper 
  • Learned a dry plate and paper technique that eliminates the need to calendar and issues associated with damp paper’s tendency to expand and contract leading to registration issues.
  • Technique for printing paper plate including:
    • Mixing of ink
    • Registration 

Image #20.

  • Japanese Stab Binding
    • cutting cover
    • cutting pages
    • cutting cover sheet
    • cutting spine and glueing spine to cover sheet
    • assembly of book and binding
  • print exchange
    • each student contributes an editioned print to each classmate for installation in their book
  • design of colophon and placement behind coversheet